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How to Assert Yourself After a Brain Injury

How to Assert Yourself After a Brain Injury

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Hey guys, it's Adam, and today I want to talk to you about how to assert yourself and how to tell people that you want to do it on your own. As a veteran with traumatic brain injury it's really important to have a level of confidence in your own abilities and also know how to express that. A lot of times, I've seen and I've personally witnessed veterans who may have troubles with balance, and they'll be walking down a staircase. The caregivers, the general public, other people might come up and pester you-- "Oh, do you need help? Are you okay?" "Can I help you down the stairs?" Obviously, that may not be the answer that you want to hear, and so respectfully and politely asserting yourself and saying, "No, thank you," "I've got this. It just takes me a little bit longer." One thing you can do is kind of defray the direct conflict with a joke. Say something ridiculous or outrageous, like "Oh no, I just don't take stairs as well as I used to." Or say something like, "Absolutely, I just like to take my time. I'm enjoying the view," or "I'm enjoying the walk." Let them know with confidence that you're going to be able to walk down the stairs by yourself, or whatever activity it is, and that you appreciate their help, but you don't need it at this point. Thanks.

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People want to help if they see you struggling, but sometimes you want to do whatever you are doing on your own, says Adam. Maybe you have balance problems and taking the stairs is slow going. Make a joke or thank people, but carry on yourself.

 
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Hi, I’m Adam Anicich

I’m a former Army Sergeant, a Department of Veterans Affairs employee, a service-disabled vet, and someone with a brain injury. I’m here to share my story with you — along with some practical tips — and I hope that I can help you in your own journey of recovery.

Learn more about Adam >

 

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