BrainLine Military

A Service of brainline.org


Turn off text only


Page Utilities

 

Brain Injury Symptoms

Brain injury has become known as the signature wound of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan because of the prevalence of the injury. As of 2011, more than 212,000 service members sustained a TBI. Symptoms — both physical and psychological — can also be difficult to diagnose and sometimes they don't appear immediately.

Although they can overlap, symptoms from a TBI are usually divided up into two basic categories: physical and emotional. The most common physical symptoms range from headaches and trouble sleeping to loss of balance and tinnitus, or ringing in the ears. Behavioral and emotional symptoms can range from depression and apathy to verbal outbursts and disinhibition.

Because they can be seen and measured, physical symptoms are often easier and faster to treat than emotional symptoms. And more serious physical problems can mean more serious emotional problems; they often go hand in hand. Although some service members with TBI have to adapt to physical or emotional issues resulting from TBI, many wounded veterans explore ways that they can remain involved with the military culture. Most will return to duty, some will require supports and modifications, and all will carry their military experiences with them into their futures.

Sort by: Topic | A-Z | Z-A | Newest | Oldest

article content icon
January 28, 2016
Concussions affect everyone differently. Not all symptoms improve at the same rate—some take longer than others.
video content icon
July 1, 2014
A moving documentary episode in which one family struggles in the wake of combat-related TBI and PTSD.
video content icon
July 1, 2014
A marriage is put in crisis when a Marine returns home from Iraq with TBI and PTSD.
video content icon
July 1, 2014
Jerry Cortinas, retired from US Special Forces, struggles after returning home to his family with an amputated hand, TBI, and PTSD.
video content icon
Dr. Jack Tsao talks about how 85 percent of concussions in the military happen during training, in sports, or in vehicle crashes not in combat.
video content icon
Dr. Jack Tsao talks explains the symptoms associated with TBI and PTSD, how they can exacerbate each other, and the best treatment approach.
video content icon
Kristen Maisano, OTD | September 27, 2013
Occupational therapist Kristen Maisano talks about the most common symptoms of mild TBI and PTSD, like emotional regulation and sleep issues, and what strategies can help.
video content icon
Jordan Grafman, PhD | February 11, 2013
Dr. Jordan Grafman talks about how people who had a higher level of skills, interests, and motivation before a brain injury tend to have a better outcome than those who did not.
article content icon
January 1, 2009
What happens when you have no filter for sounds, smells, images, and feelings after brain injury?

Anxiety & Stress

article content icon
March 29, 2013
Resilience can best be understood as a type of response to intense stress. By definition, resilience means "bouncing" or "returning to form."
article content icon
March 29, 2013
Think of emotional resilience as armor for the mind, push-ups for the brain.
article content icon
March 29, 2013
The Stress Continuum is a model that identifies how Sailors and Marines react under stressful situations and what to do to help.
video content icon
March 13, 2012
One-on-one conversations are easy and fun, but for someone like Adam, who has a brain injury, being in a large group can be challenging.

Behavioral & Emotional Symptoms

article content icon
January 26, 2016
Mood and behavior changes may appear after a concussion or mild TBI. You or your loved one may not understand why this is happening or know what to do. Trying these tips may improve these feelings.
video content icon
March 2, 2015
Several hundred thousand service members have sustained TBI since 9/11.  For most of these vets, the long-term challenge is dealing with profound changes in social skills and  the ongoing demands of daily life.
article content icon
August 28, 2014
Why do cavemen have the upperhand to humans today when it comes to calming down after a stressful situation?
article content icon
June 11, 2014
"I understand that you feel trapped and lost. I’d like to help you to move forward," says the OT to the Army vet.
video content icon
Glenn W. Parkinson, MSW, MA | December 4, 2013
Glenn Parkinson, MSW explains how people with TBI can sometimes lose their social filter after injury and what strategies can help.
video content icon
Kristen Maisano, OTD | November 18, 2013
Hypervigilance is a crucial skill to have while in combat, but once in the civilian world, it is hard to turn off. Occupational therapist Kristen Maisano talks about how to create step-by-step goals to do just that.
video content icon
Lt. Col. Jeffrey Yarvis, PhD | October 28, 2013
Lt. Col Jeffrey Yarvis, PhD talks about how increasing the ratio of positive to negative thoughts does, in fact, help with recovery from TBI and PTSD.
video content icon
Heechin Chae, MD | October 21, 2013
Dr. Heechin Chae explains how the brain — in response to the neurochemical changes from an injury — can go into a protective state, a defensive state to protect itself from further injury.
video content icon
Kristen Maisano, OTD | October 7, 2013
Sometimes people with mild TBI experience disinhibition — a difficulty filtering what they say. Practicing strategies in the clinic first helps patients and therapists see what works and what doesn't.
video content icon
Lt. Col. Jeffrey Yarvis, PhD | September 9, 2013
Lt. Col Jeffrey Yarvis, PhD discusses strategies to help families recognize what triggers anger from TBI and/or PTSD and what strategies to use to minimize it.
article content icon
June 14, 2013
Women play a key role in encouraging men to seek help for health problems, especially when it involves men in the military service and PTSD.
video content icon
"With any kind of trauma — physical or psychological — there comes a sense of betrayal, and with that grief. Regaining a sense of personal control is critical."
video content icon
Paul Aravich, PhD | February 14, 2013
Dr. Paul Aravich talks about how soldiers, veterans, and civilians can prevent and get treatment for the behavioral complications from TBI that can worsen with age.
video content icon
Jordan Grafman, PhD | February 11, 2013
In a study of Vietnam veterans with TBI, Dr. Jordan Grafman showed that problems navigating social behaviors were the most definitive factors for not being able to return to work.
video content icon
Jordan Grafman, PhD | February 11, 2013
Researchers are focusing on what damage to the frontal lobes means for a person interviewing for a job, for example, or eating in a restaurant.
video content icon
November 26, 2012
It's understandable that service members and veterans can get angry or frustrated when witnessing people in the civilian world getting upset about something trivial like a coffee made wrong. Adam shares some ideas.
video content icon
October 15, 2012
For some service members and veterans like Adam, returning from a depolyment can feel like riding an emotional rollercoaster. He recommends trying to recognize these emotions, to become more self-aware as a way to break the vicious cycle of intense emotions and frustration.
video content icon
October 1, 2012
Adam shares an email from a Marine's wife about "brain fatigue." She worries that people — including her injured husband — think he is lazy or less proactive when it's simply a physiological symptom of the TBI. Adam offers kind and sage advice.
video content icon
September 10, 2012
Adam knows from his experiences as well as those of most of his friends with TBI that social situations can be difficult. Sometimes they know they can come off as "rude or self-absorbed" but that way of being, or seeming, is more a function of cognitive dysfunction.
video content icon
September 4, 2012
It's common for service members and veterans, like Adam, with a brain injury and/or post-traumatic stress to return home from combat and have intense feelings they don't know what to do with. But with help and patience, these emotions will settle down.
article content icon
May 5, 2011
Not asking for help, or asking too late, can turn a manageable situation into something more serious …
article content icon
May 5, 2011
Healthcare professionals and families often encounter individuals who need, but do not know how to ask for help.
article content icon
April 1, 2011
Trauma is a fact of life, but it doesn't have to be a life sentence. Learn to heal your body and mind after post-deployment syndrome.
article content icon
October 1, 2010
More research is needed to understand the psychiatric and neurologic consequences of combat.
video content icon
Deborah Little, PhD | May 25, 2010
Learn why after being in combat zone, drinking and driving may not seem like risky behavior.
article content icon
January 1, 2008
Learn more about the psychological and cognitive wounds of war — and where to get help.

Depression

video content icon
Anand Veeravagu, MD | October 21, 2013
Dr. Anand Veeravagu says that it is the mission of the DoD and the VA to continue to put combat-related mental health issues at the forefront of care.
video content icon
"Doctors ask patients how their pain ranks on a scale of one to 10. I would like to see a similarly institutioanlized scale used when talking about suicidality," says Lt. Col Jeffrey Yarvis, PhD.
video content icon
"Being professional, open, and matter-of-fact with people about death, dying, and suicidality is very important," says Lt. Col Jeffrey Yarvis, PhD.
video content icon
April 8, 2013
Suicide is invariably tricky to discuss. Adam talks about what signs and symptoms people should be aware of for themselves and for their loved ones who are depressed and also what resources are out there to help.
article content icon
September 26, 2011
Depression is one of the most common symptoms after a combat-related brain injury. Learn how to help your service member or veteran.
video content icon
Maria Mouratidis, PsyD | March 4, 2009
BrainLine talks with Dr. Maria Mouratidis about how to address thoughts of suicide in someone dealing with a TBI, PTSD, or depression.

Headaches

Memory Problems

article content icon
January 28, 2016
11 ways to improve your memory after a mild traumatic brain injury.
video content icon
January 22, 2013
A friend of Adam's told him about the Pomodoro Technique — a time management method that breaks up periods of work into 25-minute intervals. In a nutshell, frequent breaks can improve focus and mental agility.

Physical Symptoms of Brain Injury

article content icon
January 27, 2016
Dizziness is one of the symptoms that you may experience after a concussion. It may make you feel unsteady and like things are moving when they are not.
video content icon
Dr. Jack Tsao says that, to date, there is no research showing that TBI directly causes PTSD but there may be a higher likelihood of someone with TBI developing PTSD.
video content icon
January 7, 2013
Pain can negatively color one's life, especially when that person has a brain injury where energy is at a premium as it is. Adam shares his advice.
article content icon
July 6, 2012
This chapter is about possible physical effects from TBI.

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

video content icon
November 1, 2016
As an epidemic of suicide among veterans sweeps the country, the medical model fails to make a large enough impact. Is this war detox program the cure? U.S Army Veteran Jake Clark believes so.
video content icon
November 1, 2016
At the core of the "Save a Warrior" program is Transcendental Meditation (TM). Retired U.S. Army Airborne Ranger Dusty Baxley explains how warriors can use TM to find relief from the overwhelming barrage of thoughts and other post-traumatic symptoms like aggression, anxiety, and insomnia.
video content icon
November 1, 2016
The horses are like the soldiers — they're highly sensitive and they don't trust easily. For U.S. Army Veteran Garrett Combs, working with one of the horses leads to a major breakthrough in his healing process.
video content icon
November 1, 2016
U.S. Army veteran and "Save a Warrior" founder Jake Clark explains the why the program's rope course is such an important part of war detox and how it provides a protective factor against suicide.
video content icon
June 27, 2016
“I knew I was different when I came back from war.”
article content icon
June 23, 2016
An easy-to-read infographic covering the basics of PTSD — common causes, symptom categories, PTSD numbers and clinically recommended treatment options
video content icon
May 18, 2015
Dr. Stephen Cozza, Uniformed Service University, discusses TBI and PTSD statistics and the impact it has on service members and their families.
video content icon
May 18, 2015
Military health-related problems due to combat exposure are not purely military problems, DoD problems, or VA problems. They are national problems and we need to be thinking about national solutions in order to address them.
article content icon
July 14, 2014
Use this infographic to learn the symptoms that can help you discriminate between TBI and PTSD for patients who have only one or the other.
video content icon
July 14, 2014
"One of the most important things that I tell the soldiers is they're not crazy. They're having a normal reaction to an abnormal situation…"
article content icon
June 10, 2014
Learn exactly what post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, is and what can trigger it.
slideshow content icon
June 4, 2014
The brain is incredibly complex — take an interactive journey to see how the brainworks and what impact a traumatic event can have.
article content icon
March 7, 2014
More than 200,000 women make up nearly 15 percent of  the US Armed Forces — and just like the men, many have TBI and PTSD.
slideshow content icon
January 28, 2014
Apps to help with PTSD.
article content icon
December 9, 2013
It’s easy to confuse post-traumatic stress (PTS) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In addition to sharing similar names, there’s considerable overlap in symptoms between the two conditions.
video content icon
Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD | December 4, 2013
Service members and veterans often don't want to admit they have symptoms of PTSD, or maybe they are not aware that they do. Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD talks about how healthcare providers can ask the right questions to help.
video content icon
Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD | December 4, 2013
Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD talks about how using evidence-based guidelines, healthcare providers can work with patients to take small steps as a way to feel safe and in control of their own progress.
video content icon
Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD | December 4, 2013
"We all do better when we have people to help us bear the weight of our burden," says Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD. People with PTSD have a better outcome when they are supported by friends, family, colleagues, and community.
video content icon
Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD | December 4, 2013
In the military, service members are taught: "Say later, stay alive!" But once home, says Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD, that feeling of being on high alert is hard to turn off.
video content icon
Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD | December 4, 2013
After making sure a patient is safe, healthcare providers could start with the question, "If life were to be better for your tomorrow, what would you notice?" The answer might be simply be a good night's sleep or feeling at peace.
article content icon
Elise Mitchell | November 18, 2013
"PTSD is cyclical. It moves in waves. It's always present, but for us and our situation, there seems to be ups and downs."
video content icon
Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD | September 27, 2013
Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD talks about how injury to different parts of the brain like the amygdala or the frontal lobe can affect behavior and how best to approach treatment.
article content icon
June 24, 2013
Assessment after a TBI in a combat zone may help providers identify those most at risk of suicide.
video content icon
June 17, 2013
As a combat photographer, Staff Sgt. Stacy Pearsall received numerous physical injuries and experienced PTSD from the events she witnessed. With help from a friend, she found the help she needed.
video content icon
"The best time to get treatment for PTSD is now," says Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD. Now can mean soon after the trauma or now can mean 10 years later when symptoms have a delayed onset.
video content icon
Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD talks about how the timeline of symptoms ain acute versus chronic PTSD and in what time frame they abate. The highest recovery happenss within the first year.
video content icon
For people with PTSD, the fight or flight response can be an effective way to avoid unwanted feelings. But avoidance is not a long-term strategy for a happy life.
video content icon
Treatments for TBI and PTSD can often overlap since symptoms can overlap. However, if drug interventions are used, it is important to make sure there is no threat of negative drug interactions.
video content icon
Above all else, listen to what your patients with PTSD and TBI are saying. Use evidence-based practices, establish trust ... and listen.
video content icon
Lt. Col Jeffrey Yarvis, PhD talks about how exposure therapy can be incredibly effective for service members with TBI and PTSD because it helps undo, or lessen, the effects of response-generated traumas.
article content icon
June 14, 2013
If you have PTSD you don’t have to suffer. This booklet describes therapies and medications that are proven to help people with PTSD.
video content icon
Michael Roy, MD, Col. (Ret.) talks about how parts of the brain are affected when injured ― from the frontal lobe which houses our emotions to the amygdala which  oversees our fight or flight response.
video content icon
Like treating heart disease before a heart attack, says Michael Roy, MD, Col. (Ret.), treating symptoms like anxiety and hypervigilance before they may become part of a full PTSD diagnosis makes the most sense.
video content icon
Sometimes PTSD is not fully manifest until treatment for the symptoms of TBI begins.
video content icon
Michael Roy, MD, Col. (Ret.) talks about helping service members and veterans learn ways to decrease their anxiety in therapy, which can later translate into strategies to use in life.
video content icon
Michael Roy, MD, Col. (Ret.) talks about the efficacy of using Virtual Iraq for treating PTSD, an experiential technology with sights, sounds, and smells that can be highly individualized for the person's experience.
video content icon
Virtual reality to treat people with PTSD can be incredibly effective because it helps trigger recalls and stimulate the senses in ways that pure talk therapy cannot.
video content icon
Exposure therapy — asking patients with PTSD to close their eyes, imagine themselves back in that traumatic situation, and retell their story — is inherently difficult for people with PTSD, but confronting fears can also be the key to the cure.
video content icon
"Medicines seem to help about 50% of people with PTSD," says Michael Roy, MD, Col. (Ret.). "But I see them as a band-aid; they can smooth things over but they don't deal with or help solve the underlying causes."
video content icon
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy can help people with PTSD look at their behaviors and then use strategies, like relaxation techniques, to overcome the fears and anxieties related to their traumatic experiences.
video content icon
Michael Roy, MD, Col. (Ret.) talks about the various means to diagnose PTSD from evaluations and checklists, which rely totally on a person's self-report, to functional MRI imaging and psychophysiological techniques.
video content icon
Michael Roy, MD, Col. (Ret.) explains how the Virtual Iraq/Afghanistan technology uses sights, smells, and sounds to help service members and veterans deal and overcome the very intense symptoms of PTSD.
article content icon
June 14, 2013
Navy Capt. Paul S. Hammer, director of the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health & Traumatic Brain Injury talks about why the brain is the most important organ in the human body.
article content icon
June 14, 2013
Luis Carlos Montalvan is a decorated war veteran with PTSD and a TBI sustained while serving two tours in Iraq. Here's what his service dog, Tuesday, might say if he could talk.
article content icon
June 14, 2013
"I used to think that if I was quiet as a mouse, my Daddy would be okay, but that’s not true. My Mom says my Dad has PTSD." Read this book, written for kids who have a dad with PTSD.
article content icon
June 14, 2013
"I used to think that if I was quiet as a mouse, my Mommy would be okay, but that’s not true. My Mom has PTSD." Read this book, written for kids who have a mom with PTSD.
video content icon
June 3, 2013
If you or a loved one is experiencing symptoms of TBI or PTSD, you're depressed, isolating yourself, or just feeling like something is not right in your head, reach out for help. It is never too early to get the help you need.
video content icon
Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD talks about various treatments for PTSD including imaginal and behavioral exposure treatments as well as addressing issues of guilt and hypervigilance.
video content icon
Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD explains word for word what exactly PTSD is, how it can affect someone in the short- and long-term, and what can be done to treat it.
video content icon
Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD talks about the concerns service members and veterans with PTSD have and how health providers can set a foundation for healing.
video content icon
Even as babies, children don't miss a beat; they pick up on their parents' emotions. A parent with PTSD can learn that being honest with himself and his family plus knowing his emotional limitations will help the whole family.
video content icon
"People who seek psychological help are the kind of people who have the courage to foster the resilience needed to tolerate the traumas that life can sometimes bring."
video content icon
A person's reaction and recovery to a traumatic event depends on what life experience he or she had before the event.
video content icon
March 12, 2013
"I just wanted to turn off the 600 TV sets that were going on all the time in my head." Hear Maj. Jeff Hall's story that went from thoughts of suicide to finding his way back to his family and life.
article content icon
March 7, 2013
Often people talk about the effects of TBI or the consequences of PTSD as separate conditions — which they are. But for the person who is living with the dual diagnosis of TBI and PTSD, it can be hard to separate them.
video content icon
Paul Aravich, PhD | February 14, 2013
Dr. Paul Aravich talks about PTSD and other serious mental disorders as types of brain injuries, which can come with an increased risk for dementia later in life.
article content icon
February 13, 2013
The story of one Marine's job retrieving and examing the remains of fellow soldiers lost in combat and the crippling psychological toll this experience took once she was stateside.
video content icon
Jordan Grafman, PhD | February 11, 2013
Thanks to the input of the caregivers of Vietnam vets enrolled in a longevity study, researchers have been better able to examine the toll of TBI on a person's social behavior.
video content icon
January 25, 2013
Former Marine Mike Zacchea does not remember his wedding. Or a trip to Florida. For a long time, he didn't realize he had sustained several debilitating blast-related concussions as well as PTSD.
video content icon
January 25, 2013
"PTSD turns my husband into a monster. But my husband is a hero. He is not a monster."
video content icon
January 25, 2013
Matt Brown, who suffers from combat-related TBI and PTSD, talks about how his family helped him defeat his suicidal tendencies and his depression — and become human again.
video content icon
January 25, 2013
Former Marine Matt Brown, who suffers from combat-related TBI and PTSD — talks about strategies and games that have helped him with his memory and daily routine.
video content icon
January 25, 2013
Mike Zacchea finally got psychological help after setting his house on fire because he thought his wife was an insurgent.
video content icon
January 25, 2013
Although she hates to have to talk to her husband — who suffers from combat-related TBI and PTSD — like a child, sometimes that's the only way she can get him to understand her.
video content icon
January 25, 2013
Former Marine Matt Brown, who has TBI and PTSD, was dangerously suicidal and he would never "sugarcoat" that fact. It was finding his voice to help others that saved him.
article content icon
January 22, 2013
Whether it’s fishing or rock climbing, horseback riding or snow skiing, outings can provide wounded veterans exercise and mental escape.
article content icon
January 22, 2013
A lot can happen in 14 months in Iraq. Spc. William Medlin found talking about his trauma with a counselor helped.
article content icon
January 17, 2013
Military and government agencies have done little to help female veterans transition into civilian life. Three veterans at UNC Charlotte decided to forge their own paths.
article content icon
January 16, 2013
The breaking point came when Sandra Rivera found their 9-year-old son backed against a wall with his arms over his face, shielding himself from her husband’s screaming.
video content icon
Dr. Geoffrey Ling talks about the importance of an interdisciplinary team to treat TBI and PTSD because oftentimes, if one is left untreated, treatment for the other often stays stalled.
video content icon
January 14, 2013
Adam knows that sometimes for veterans life after combat feels like its being lived on autopilot — with little joy. Adam shares some ideas and strategies to turn that situation around.
article content icon
January 7, 2013
“TBI is not a derogatory term. It is not career-ending. Hiding it from everyone else is derelict. You could get other people killed. If you don’t ask for help, it makes you less of a man.” Read Karl Holt's story.
article content icon
January 4, 2013
It took almost nine years for Marine Michael Grywalsky to get the help he needed for TBI and PTSD. Without the tenacity of his wife, he may never have gotten it.
article content icon
January 3, 2013
It was when her injured veteran husband said "yet," that Andrea Sawyer was truly terrified.
video content icon
December 11, 2012
Sometimes service members and veterans with TBI and/or PTSD find it easier to be alone, away from people — even family and friends. But ultimately, that is not healthy. Adam shares ideas to help loved ones ease back into life events without adding stress.
article content icon
November 16, 2012
Using a common sense approach, Major Charles Hall helps injured Marines find their way forward.
video content icon
Shane McNamee, MD | September 28, 2012
Dr. McNamee's passion is to get people with TBI and combat stress back to work, back to the next phases of their lives.
video content icon
Shane McNamee, MD | September 28, 2012
Healthcare providers can help vets with TBI and combat stress find other ways than pharmaceuticals to help in recovery — from riding horses to kayaking with other vets.
video content icon
Shane McNamee, MD | September 28, 2012
The VA works creatively to help patients with TBI and combat stress — and their families — recover and rebuild a full life.
video content icon
Gerard Riedy, MD, PhD | September 28, 2012
The NICoE has $10 million worth of neuroimaging equipment for evaluating TBI and psychological health issues, most importantly, the MRI, the PET scan, and the MEG.
video content icon
Shane McNamee, MD | September 27, 2012
Traumatic — and joyful — experiences change who we are. We cannot "fix" soldiers coming home with combat stress, rather help them move on and become new versions of themselves.
video content icon
Shane McNamee, MD | September 27, 2012
Combat exposure can damage the brain physically and psychologically. Working to find the causes of these injuries will help with the nuances of treatment.
video content icon
Shane McNamee, MD | September 27, 2012
How could going to Walmart ever feel "normal" after combat-induced stress? Dr. Shane McNamee of the VA talks about the physical and psychological effects of blast injuries.
video content icon
Robin Weinick, PhD | September 24, 2012
The RAND Corporation is continuing its research, looking at what programs for TBI and psychological health in soldiers and veterans are working best and how to share that knowledge.
video content icon
Robin Weinick, PhD | September 24, 2012
The main recommendations from RAND report on TBI and psych health included centralizing information, addressing gaps, and studying ways in which programs can find people with early symptoms.
video content icon
Robin Weinick, PhD | September 24, 2012
Service members, veterans, their families, and professionals can find programs to help with brain injury and psychological health at Military OneSource and the Rand Corporation.
article content icon
May 23, 2012
With a significant life crisis like a brain injury, paralysis, or being a POW, comes great challenge and change. But with it can also come the opportunity for significant growth.
article content icon
May 18, 2012
Not everyone has experience communicating with people with disabilities, but as with anyone, be respectful and courteous.
article content icon
May 16, 2012
Army veteran and documentarian Justin Springer tells the story of four service members who struggle in the wake of blast-related brain injuries.
video content icon
Joel Scholten, MD | February 15, 2012
When looking at the full-picture treatment for people with TBI, clinicians need to ask leading questions about issues including alcohol and caffeine use, intimacy or sexual issues, and suicide risk.
video content icon
November 8, 2011
This documentary follows the journey of childhood friends who join the National Guard and end up combat veterans dealing with TBI and PTSD.
article content icon
August 15, 2011
Navy Safe Harbor wants everyone to know that Sailors, Coast Guardsmen, and veterans with TBI and PTSD should be treated as the heroes that they are.
article content icon
May 13, 2011
Many children may develop symptoms that mirror those of their injured military parent. Learn more.
article content icon
May 10, 2011
Army vet Timm Lovitt finds that reaching out to help other vets is his own best medicine.
article content icon
April 1, 2011
"Maybe the ultimate wound is the one that makes you miss the war you got it in."
video content icon
January 31, 2011
A real hero knows when to ask for help. Sgt. Josh Hopper, who sustained a TBI in Iraq, is one such hero.
video content icon
David Cifu, MD | November 12, 2010
Post-deployment syndrome can include concussion, PTSD, major depression, chronic pain, and general anxiety disorder.
video content icon
David Cifu, MD | November 12, 2010
Successful recovery from post-deployment syndrome starts with good sleep hygiene.
video content icon
David Cifu, MD | November 12, 2010
Not knowing the root of medical and psychological problems often exacerbates the issues; a clear diagnosis is important for successful recovery.
video content icon
David Cifu, MD | November 12, 2010
With the help of your doctor and your family, laying out a strategy with priorities for recovery makes all the difference in recovery.
video content icon
David Cifu, MD | November 12, 2010
Start by creating good sleep patterns and addressing headaches; then it's time to tackle the other symptoms.
video content icon
David Cifu, MD | November 12, 2010
Clinicians need to define a methodical framework of recovery for people with post-deployment syndrome.
video content icon
Harvey Jacobs, PhD | November 12, 2010
Symptoms of TBI and PTSD overlap; treating the whole person is crucial.
video content icon
March 16, 2010
Learn more about how the military addresses mild TBI and PTSD in their soldiers.
article content icon
June 20, 2009
Life as he knew it ended with a shock wave through his brain. A sister shares her story.
article content icon
January 1, 2007
Learn more about this complex and sometimes debilitating mental state.

Sleeping Problems

video content icon
Anthony Panettiere, MD | June 9, 2014
Neurologist and sleep medicine physician Anthony Panettiere talks about how to help people with TBI retrain their brain to regulate sleep pressure and get consistent, restorative sleep.
video content icon
Anthony Panettiere, MD | June 5, 2014
Neurologist and sleep medicine physician Anthony Panettiere talks about the need to get your thoughts and feelings out of the way in order to reach the imagery stage that leads to sound sleep.
video content icon
Anthony Panettiere, MD | June 5, 2014
Some people are long sleepers who need 10-12 hours a night while others are short sleepers, needing only 4-6. Most people, fall in the middle. TBI and/or PTSD can disrupt sleep, usually temporarily.
video content icon
Anthony Panettiere, MD | June 5, 2014
Neurologist and sleep medicine physician Anthony Panettiere talks about how catching up on sleep can be a good fix, but not as a regular way of balancing sleep and awake hours.
video content icon
Anthony Panettiere, MD | June 5, 2014
"You can't sacrifice sleep for a protracted period of time and get away with it," says Dr. Anthony Panettiere. Extended lack of sleep can increase mood problems, risk of accidents, and sometimes cause medical issues like heart disease and dementia.
video content icon
Anthony Panettiere, MD | June 5, 2014
Dr. Anthony Panettiere says that sleep problems after TBI and/or PTSD are common including difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, waking up too early, nightmares, and sleep apnea.
video content icon
Anthony Panettiere, MD | June 4, 2014
Dr. Anthony Panettiere talks about the fact that sleepiness is one of the main causes of car crashes and how some high-end car manufacturers are creating tools that monitor the driver's blink rate and reaction time.
video content icon
Anthony Panettiere, MD | June 4, 2014
Neurologist and sleep medicine physician Anthony Panettiere believes that providers who treat their patients with respect, giving validation to their symptoms, will get a more honest and accurate report of what is going on medically.
article content icon
Nathan D. Zasler, MD | February 21, 2012
A neuropsychological exam can often get to the root of sleep issues.
article content icon
July 11, 2011
Sleep disturbances are among the most prevalent and disturbing symptoms for service members and veterans with TBI. Learn more.
article content icon
April 1, 2010
Counseling and medication can improve sleep after blast-related TBI.

Thinking / Cognitive Symptoms

video content icon
February 4, 2013
Like other veterans with TBI, Adam finds talking on a cellphone stressful and uncomfortable. He prefers talking face-to-face with people — that way he can hear better and also see the person's body language.
article content icon
December 3, 2009
The combination of mild TBI and PTSD can influence performance.

Vision Problems

article content icon
June 8, 2011
Researchers found that blast-related TBI is strongly associated with visual disorders within one year post-injury.
article content icon
January 1, 2007
Learn more about the visual problems associated with polytrauma injury.
 


BrainLine Footer

Javascript is disabled. Please be aware that some parts of the site may not function as expected!