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July 15, 2014
Oftentimes, though in a civilian population, what you're dealing with isn't an acute concussion. You're dealing with these co-occurring conditions which have been brewing for a long time…
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July 14, 2014
"One of the most important things that I tell the soldiers is they're not crazy. They're having a normal reaction to an abnormal situation…"
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July 1, 2014
A moving documentary episode in which one family struggles in the wake of combat-related TBI and PTSD.
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July 1, 2014
A marriage is put in crisis when a Marine returns home from Iraq with TBI and PTSD.
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July 1, 2014
Jerry Cortinas, retired from US Special Forces, struggles after returning home to his family with an amputated hand, TBI, and PTSD.
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July 1, 2014
With the support of his wife, Jerry Cortinas who is living with TBI and PTSD, tries adaptive skiing for the first time.
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July 1, 2014
In Chapter 3 of this documentary episode, Jerry Cortinas, who has TBI and a missing hand, successfully tackles the mountain on a snowboard.
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Col. Sidney Hinds, MD | June 30, 2014
Col. Sidney Hinds, MD talks about guidelines and systems used in the combat setting to help diagnose concussion — from the MACE card to the incidence-based reporting system.
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Col. Sidney Hinds, MD | June 30, 2014
Col. Sidney Hinds, MD talks about why an incident-reporting system of concussions in combat is more effective than a patient- or symptom-reporting system.
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Col. Sidney Hinds, MD | June 30, 2014
Col. Sidney Hinds, MD talks about TBI care in military concussion care centers, concussion specialists, and evacuation, depending on the severity of injury.
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Col. Sidney Hinds, MD | June 30, 2014
Col. Sidney Hinds, MD talks about the importance of having standardized care for traumatic brain injury in combat and back at home.
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Col. Sidney Hinds, MD | June 30, 2014
Col. Sidney Hinds, MD talks how greater than 80% of military concussions occur “in garrison,” not in combat.
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Col. Sidney Hinds, MD | June 30, 2014
Col. Sidney Hinds, MD talks about how doctors and researchers are looking at why some people recover more easily than others from TBI, and how treatment could vary.
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Col. Sidney Hinds, MD | June 30, 2014
Col. Sidney Hinds, MD talks how, after a concussion, service members need supervised rest and then step-by-step return to daily activities.
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Col. Sidney Hinds, MD | June 30, 2014
Col. Sidney Hinds, MD talks his goals as national director of DVBIC — from standardized care across all platforms to emphasizing patient-focused care.
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Col. Sidney Hinds, MD | June 30, 2014
Col. Sidney Hinds, MD talks about current research for diagnosing and treating brain injury — from neurocognitive assessment tools to the role of complex neuroimaging.
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Anthony Panettiere, MD | June 9, 2014
Neurologist and sleep medicine physician Anthony Panettiere talks about how to help people with TBI retrain their brain to regulate sleep pressure and get consistent, restorative sleep.
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Anthony Panettiere, MD | June 5, 2014
Neurologist and sleep medicine physician Anthony Panettiere talks about the need to get your thoughts and feelings out of the way in order to reach the imagery stage that leads to sound sleep.
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Anthony Panettiere, MD | June 5, 2014
Some people are long sleepers who need 10-12 hours a night while others are short sleepers, needing only 4-6. Most people, fall in the middle. TBI and/or PTSD can disrupt sleep, usually temporarily.
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Anthony Panettiere, MD | June 5, 2014
Neurologist and sleep medicine physician Anthony Panettiere talks about how catching up on sleep can be a good fix, but not as a regular way of balancing sleep and awake hours.
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Anthony Panettiere, MD | June 5, 2014
"You can't sacrifice sleep for a protracted period of time and get away with it," says Dr. Anthony Panettiere. Extended lack of sleep can increase mood problems, risk of accidents, and sometimes cause medical issues like heart disease and dementia.
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Anthony Panettiere, MD | June 5, 2014
Dr. Anthony Panettiere says that sleep problems after TBI and/or PTSD are common including difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, waking up too early, nightmares, and sleep apnea.
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Anthony Panettiere, MD | June 4, 2014
Dr. Anthony Panettiere talks about the fact that sleepiness is one of the main causes of car crashes and how some high-end car manufacturers are creating tools that monitor the driver's blink rate and reaction time.
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Anthony Panettiere, MD | June 4, 2014
Neurologist and sleep medicine physician Anthony Panettiere believes that providers who treat their patients with respect, giving validation to their symptoms, will get a more honest and accurate report of what is going on medically.
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March 18, 2014
Adam thanks you — his blog viewers and supporters — and encourages you to continue the discussion and awareness raising about TBI and PTSD; the battle does not stop here.
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February 24, 2014
If extra time on a test or memory aids can make life easier during college, why not use them? Adam talks about moving past the "stigma" of using disability services and getting the help you need to succeed in college.
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February 18, 2014
When it comes to TBI and PTSD, everyone's recovery is different. But Adam shares three key principles that can be crucial for everyone.
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Dr. Jack Tsao talks about the debate around computerized baseline testing: is it useful, is it comprehensive, and when is the appropriate time for retesting.
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Dr. Jack Tsao says that, to date, there is no research showing that TBI directly causes PTSD but there may be a higher likelihood of someone with TBI developing PTSD.
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Dr. Jack Tsao talks about how 85 percent of concussions in the military happen during training, in sports, or in vehicle crashes not in combat.
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Dr. Jack Tsao talks about research on military-related CTE and what questions are being asked — from who is most susceptible to can it develop from blast injuries rather than direct hits to the head.
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Dr. Jack Tsao talks explains the symptoms associated with TBI and PTSD, how they can exacerbate each other, and the best treatment approach.
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Dr. Jack Tsao talks about recent policy changes and how all branches of the military are working together  to coordinate better concussion diagnosis and treatment.
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February 3, 2014
TBI? PTSD? Both? No matter your diagnosis, Adam says that taking the first steps to get help is what will matter most for a successful recovery.
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January 27, 2014
Transitioning from military to civilian life can take time and can be tricky. Adam talks about how student veteran groups on college campuses can help vets reintegrate socially in their own way and  time.
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January 21, 2014
Adam shares an inspiring story about a friend with TBI and PTSD who almost ended his life but instead found the courage to ask for help — even though at the time he may not have known what that help looked like.
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January 6, 2014
Adam offers advice to caregivers of a loved one with TBI and/or PTSD — from simply trying to see how that person's life has changed to helping him get involved in confidence-boosting activities.
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December 30, 2013
Adam talks frankly about his challenges keeping up with family and friends since his injury; he has good intentions but following through remains difficult.
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December 23, 2013
Service members, veterans, and their caregivers are incredibly resilient, says Adam, but learning to connect with whatever community you are in will only strengthen that resiliency.
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December 9, 2013
Adam says that like drill and ceremony and calling cadence, which start with a first step, so does recovery from a brain injury and/or PTSD.
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Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD | December 4, 2013
Service members and veterans often don't want to admit they have symptoms of PTSD, or maybe they are not aware that they do. Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD talks about how healthcare providers can ask the right questions to help.
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Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD | December 4, 2013
Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD talks about how using evidence-based guidelines, healthcare providers can work with patients to take small steps as a way to feel safe and in control of their own progress.
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Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD | December 4, 2013
"We all do better when we have people to help us bear the weight of our burden," says Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD. People with PTSD have a better outcome when they are supported by friends, family, colleagues, and community.
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Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD | December 4, 2013
In the military, service members are taught: "Say later, stay alive!" But once home, says Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD, that feeling of being on high alert is hard to turn off.
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Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD | December 4, 2013
After making sure a patient is safe, healthcare providers could start with the question, "If life were to be better for your tomorrow, what would you notice?" The answer might be simply be a good night's sleep or feeling at peace.
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Glenn W. Parkinson, MSW, MA | December 4, 2013
Glenn Parkinson, MSW explains how people with TBI can sometimes lose their social filter after injury and what strategies can help.
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Glenn W. Parkinson, MSW, MA | December 4, 2013
People with brain injury often experience hypersexuality, an increase in sex drive and/or disinhibition. Glenn Parkinson, MSW talks about why it's important to help patients with hypersexuality retrain or redirect their behaviors.
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Glenn W. Parkinson, MSW, MA | December 4, 2013
Glenn Parkinson, MSW says she often hears from people with TBI that there have been so many losses that sex is often the only thing they have left that is pleasurable. It's important to help people find healthy ways to be intimate and sexual.
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Glenn W. Parkinson, MSW, MA | December 4, 2013
Glenn Parkinson, MSW talks about how alcohol and drug use after a TBI can significantly impact a person's sexual function, his or her feelings about sex and intimacy, and the ability to connect and build a relationship.
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Glenn W. Parkinson, MSW, MA | December 4, 2013
Everyone — patient, doctor, therapist — comes with his or her own cultural, religious, and familial background when it comes to comfort levels when talking about sex and intimacy.
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Glenn W. Parkinson, MSW, MA | December 4, 2013
Sometimes making a comment like "after TBI, a lot of people have changes in their sexuality" instead of asking a question that puts a patient on the spot is more effective. From there, you can gauge when and how to address issues of sexual health.
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Glenn W. Parkinson, MSW, MA | December 4, 2013
Wtih any topic that is uncomfortable for people to experience or talk about — like sexual issues post-TBI — simply addressing it, normalizing it, then moving on is the best strategy.
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Lt. Col. Jeffrey Yarvis, PhD | December 4, 2013
Lt. Col Jeffrey Yarvis, PhD talks about Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing therapy, which has been established by extensive scientific and clinical research as an effective treatment for PTSD.
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Kristen Maisano, OTD | December 4, 2013
Occupational therapist Kristen Maisano, OTD talks about how addressing sexual health as an activity of dailing living, just like eating, dressing, and bathing, normalizes it and helps patients with TBI and their caregivers connect again.
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Kristen Maisano, OTD | December 4, 2013
Occupational therapist Kristen Maisano talks about therapy dogs, which are used in the clinic, and how they can help service members with mild TBI and PTDS in ways that humans cannot.
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Kristen Maisano, OTD | December 4, 2013
"Sometimes service members and veterans feel stuck. Rehab for TBI is not easy," says occupational therapist Kristen Maisano. "My job is to help them find what motivates them to dig deep and to set and attain incremental goals."
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Kristen Maisano, OTD | December 4, 2013
Occupational therapist Kristen Maisano talks about how spounes can help further a loved one's TBI-related thearpy because not only are they aware of changes in the person, but they can also bring strategies from the clinic to the home.
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Heechin Chae, MD | December 4, 2013
Dr. Heechin Chae recommends that primary care physicians realize they can't take care of TBI, PTSD, and other co-morbid problems in a military patient during one appointment.
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Heechin Chae, MD | December 4, 2013
Dr. Heechin Chae talks about understanding what a person truly wants to focus on during his recovery and building an individualized treatment plan with those goals in the forefront.
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Heechin Chae, MD | December 4, 2013
Helping a patient with TBI learn how to grocery shop in an actual store can be as important in TBI treatment as prescribing a medication.
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Heechin Chae, MD | December 4, 2013
Setting goals for TBI treatment is crucial, but Dr. Heechin Chae emphasizes that clairty in those goals and the steps necessary to achieve them are essential for success.
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Heechin Chae, MD | December 4, 2013
Dr. Heechin Chae says he feels like a conductor in an orchestra -- each patient is a different symphony and he has to understand that music and then come up with the exact right "instruments" and "musicians."
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Heechin Chae, MD | December 4, 2013
Dr. Heechin Chae explains that for neurogenesis to occur after an injury, the brain needs to be in a relaxed and restful state.
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Heechin Chae, MD | December 4, 2013
Dr. Heechin Chae talks about the best strategies for people with brain injury to return to their jobs, the most important and often difficult one being to return slowly and carefully.
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Heechin Chae, MD | December 4, 2013
Dr. Heechin Chae says most people with TBI can return to school but may have to develop new ways to study and learn.
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Heechin Chae, MD | December 4, 2013
Dr. Heechin Chae explains how setting goals for recovery involves not only the individual and the medical team, but the whole family since a brain injury affects everyone in a family.
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December 4, 2013
Adam shares a message of hope to those diagnosed with TBI and/or PTSD: Your life may be different, but you are still the driver and in control.
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December 4, 2013
Army Staff Sgt. Aaron Wight talks about being deployed when his son sustained a severe brain injury, how the Army helped his family cope, and how his son inspires others.
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Kristen Maisano, OTD | November 18, 2013
Hypervigilance is a crucial skill to have while in combat, but once in the civilian world, it is hard to turn off. Occupational therapist Kristen Maisano talks about how to create step-by-step goals to do just that.
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November 11, 2013
Receiving service-related disability compensation does not interfere with the funds veterans receive from the GI Bill, explains Adam.
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Glenn W. Parkinson, MSW, MA | November 5, 2013
Citizen soldiers have one boot in two worlds ... the civlian and military cultures being very different. Healthcare providers need to educate themselves on the many ways Guard and Reservists, especially after a TBI, may see themselves.
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Lt. Col. Jeffrey Yarvis, PhD | October 28, 2013
Lt. Col Jeffrey Yarvis, PhD talks about how increasing the ratio of positive to negative thoughts does, in fact, help with recovery from TBI and PTSD.
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October 28, 2013
Returning to school as a veteran — especially with a brain injury — can be difficult. Adam suggests strategies like starting slowly or taking a smaller course load that balances better with work and life.
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October 21, 2013
Managing money is complicated, especially for people with a brain injury who may have trouble remembering what they spent or creating a budget. Adam shares some tips from online banking to keeping a spending journal.
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Heechin Chae, MD | October 21, 2013
Dr. Heechin Chae explains how the brain — in response to the neurochemical changes from an injury — can go into a protective state, a defensive state to protect itself from further injury.
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Anand Veeravagu, MD | October 21, 2013
Dr. Anand Veeravagu talks about the efficacy of coordinated care among a patient's entire medical care staff and how it ties into patient-centered care and successful outcome.
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Anand Veeravagu, MD | October 21, 2013
Dr. Anand Veeravagu discusses how being at or near home, close to family and "regular" life contributes greatly to the healing process of service members and veterans with TBI and other injuries.
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Anand Veeravagu, MD | October 21, 2013
Dr. Anand Veeravagu outlines the cognitive and physical symptoms that can result from a blast injury as well as the general timeline for recovery.
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Anand Veeravagu, MD | October 21, 2013
Dr. Anand Veeravagu says that it is the mission of the DoD and the VA to continue to put combat-related mental health issues at the forefront of care.
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Kristen Maisano, OTD | October 7, 2013
Sometimes people with mild TBI experience disinhibition — a difficulty filtering what they say. Practicing strategies in the clinic first helps patients and therapists see what works and what doesn't.
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September 29, 2013
Whether taking classes online or finding a seat in a lecture hall that makes you feel safe, Adam shares ideas for vets with TBI and PTSD returning to school.
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Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD | September 27, 2013
Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD talks about how injury to different parts of the brain like the amygdala or the frontal lobe can affect behavior and how best to approach treatment.
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Kristen Maisano, OTD | September 27, 2013
Occupational therapist Kristen Maisano talks about the most common symptoms of mild TBI and PTSD, like emotional regulation and sleep issues, and what strategies can help.
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Heechin Chae, MD | September 10, 2013
Dr. Heechin Chae talks about how a brain injury is like an earthquake in a city, changing, damaging, or destroying the roads and bridges in the city of the brain.
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Heechin Chae, MD | September 10, 2013
Dr. Heechin Chae says that civilian providers treating military patients with TBI should always be sensitive to the fact that there may be emotional scars involved.
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Heechin Chae, MD | September 10, 2013
Dr. Heechin Chae says he feels like a detective when treating a patient with TBI; you have to ask the right questions so as to develop an individual treatment plan.
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Heechin Chae, MD | September 10, 2013
Dr. Heechin Chae explains how acupuncture, as fascinating and mysterious as the brain, can affect neurochemical function.
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Heechin Chae, MD | September 10, 2013
Dr. Heechin Chae explains how a person's spirituality, in whatever form, can play an important role in recovery from brain injury.
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Lt. Col. Jeffrey Yarvis, PhD | September 9, 2013
Lt. Col Jeffrey Yarvis, PhD discusses strategies to help families recognize what triggers anger from TBI and/or PTSD and what strategies to use to minimize it.
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September 9, 2013
Adam knows that the expression, "the world is your oyster" can sound exciting or scary, especially for veterans with TBI figuring out what to do after being in the military.
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Anand Veeravagu, MD | September 4, 2013
Dr. Anand Veeravagu describes this life-saving neurosurgical procedure, performed to prevent brain damage resulting from uncontrollable swelling in the brain.
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Anand Veeravagu, MD | September 4, 2013
Dr. Anand Veeravagu explains how a blast causes a swift change in pressure that generates a wave of wind, sound, and/or debris that, in turn, can damage a person's brain through a microtrauma or microbleed.
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Anand Veeravagu, MD | September 4, 2013
Dr. Anand Veeravagu talks about how Obama's BRAIN initiative will further advancements in research for TBI, stroke, Alzheimer's and other neurological conditions to the arena of clinical care.
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Anand Veeravagu, MD | September 4, 2013
With more than 266,000 diagnoses of TBI from the wars in the last decade, researchers are trying to create a "common data dictionary" that better differentiates among mild, moderate, and severe injury.
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Anand Veeravagu, MD | September 4, 2013
Dr. Anand Veeravagu talks about how the military's ability to deliver high-end acute care on the battlefield can benefit paramedics and EMTs handling acute care in the civilian world.
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Kristen Maisano, OTD | September 3, 2013
Occupational therapist Kristen Maisano talks about how and when service members with mild TBI and/or PTSD can acquire a psychological service dog.
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September 3, 2013
Adam talks about how easy it is to set up the accommodations you may need when in college with a TBI or PTSD by first getting documentation from your doctor.
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August 26, 2013
The military provides three meals a day, shelter, uniforms, and a structured schedule. The civilian side does not. Adam talks about what to be aware of when transitioning from military to civilian life.
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August 26, 2013
Adam shares his story of how polytrauma care at the VA changed his life aftter brain injury, including the unintended consequence of wanting to return to college.
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August 26, 2013
From taking notes on a laptop during class to using a voice recorder to tape a lecture to review later, technology can help veterans with brain injury succeed in college. Adam shares his first-hand knowledge.
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Glenn W. Parkinson, MSW, MA | August 19, 2013
Glenn Parkinson, MSW talks about how people can't numb out some of the hallmark feelings of PTSD like fear, anger, and vulnerability without also numbing out love, tenderness, and curiosity about another person.
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August 19, 2013
Adam knows from experience that using any accommodations in college for brain injury or other injuries is always confidential, so veterans returning to college need not worry.
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Kristen Maisano, OTD | August 12, 2013
Occupational therapist Kristen Maisano explains what activities of daily living are — from brushing teeth and getting dressed to grocery shopping and fulfilling obligations at work.
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August 12, 2013
Adam shares his experience of returning to school twice, the second time equipped with strategies and tools to help with his brain injury. "The experiences were night and day," he says.
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August 1, 2013
Patients are an integral part of the interdisciplinary polytrauma team at the Washington, D.C., VA Medical Center. The team works collaboratively with veterans to help them meet their personal goals and reintegrate back into the community, academics, and the workforce. "I've got a long way to go," says Vincent Short, Specialist (RET), U.S. Army, "but I feel very empowered."
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Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD explains how the use of imaginal or behavioral rehearsals helps service members and veterans find strategies to overcome their obstacles.
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In 1990, Kelli Gary fell asleep at the wheel and sustained a severe brain injury. Along a bumpy but ultimately successful path, Dr. Gary earned her bachelor of science degree, two masters degrees, and a PhD.
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In college after her brain injury, Kelli Gary, PhD determined her major then worked diligently and resourcefully to succeed in getting her degree.
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Kelli Gary, PhD talks about how she balanced graduate school with getting work experience and going slowly to achieve all of her goals post-brain injury.
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Speaking from personal experience, Kelli Gary, PhD knows how difficult and frustrating it can be to have to learn to study and think in entirely different ways. "But don't give up," she says. "It can be done!"
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"I look back at my years in college and graduate school and think, wow, if I had just used disability services, my life would have been a lot easier," says Kelli Gary, PhD.
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After five months in acute rehab following her car crash, Kelli Gary, PhD returned to college and tried to do what she had always done. Within two months, she was flunking out. She needed a new plan.
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Even today, after earning her PhD and two masters degrees, Kelli Gary, PhD knows that, with a TBI, sometimes you have to take one step back in order to take two steps forward.
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For Kelli Gary, PhD, one of the hardest lessons she learned was that she had accept the slow process of rebuilding her skills after brain injury in order to ultimately succeed at college.
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July 17, 2013
For many veterans, a brain injury may change the trajectory of your career path. Adam talks about how and where to seek help when exploring ideas for a new career.
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July 1, 2013
For veterans looking for school or work opportunities, there can be many questions. Adam talks with Viriginia Employment Commission Rep. William Marquez to learn more.
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June 24, 2013
After a TBI, sometimes it's hard to think of the word you want, or you get confused and forget what you were going to say. Don't be afraid to ask for help — gesture a trusted friend to help you continue the conversation.
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June 17, 2013
From doing puzzles and building Lego models to finding items in the grocery store or mapping a route on the subway, Adam shares his experiences in occupational therapy and how it really helped him during his recovery from TBI.
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June 17, 2013
As a combat photographer, Staff Sgt. Stacy Pearsall received numerous physical injuries and experienced PTSD from the events she witnessed. With help from a friend, she found the help she needed.
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"The best time to get treatment for PTSD is now," says Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD. Now can mean soon after the trauma or now can mean 10 years later when symptoms have a delayed onset.
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Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD talks about how the timeline of symptoms ain acute versus chronic PTSD and in what time frame they abate. The highest recovery happenss within the first year.
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For people with PTSD, the fight or flight response can be an effective way to avoid unwanted feelings. But avoidance is not a long-term strategy for a happy life.
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Treatments for TBI and PTSD can often overlap since symptoms can overlap. However, if drug interventions are used, it is important to make sure there is no threat of negative drug interactions.
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Above all else, listen to what your patients with PTSD and TBI are saying. Use evidence-based practices, establish trust ... and listen.
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Lt. Col Jeffrey Yarvis, PhD talks about how exposure therapy can be incredibly effective for service members with TBI and PTSD because it helps undo, or lessen, the effects of response-generated traumas.
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"Doctors ask patients how their pain ranks on a scale of one to 10. I would like to see a similarly institutioanlized scale used when talking about suicidality," says Lt. Col Jeffrey Yarvis, PhD.
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When a parent is injured or seems different because of a brain injury or post-traumatic stress, sometimes children act out — using actions instead of words to show their confusion and distress.
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Kristen Maisano, OTD | June 14, 2013
Occupational therapist Kristen Maisano, OTD talks about meeting patients were they are right now and creating step-by-step goals that take on challenges but in a methodical and careful way to effectively retrain the brain.
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Kristen Maisano, OTD | June 14, 2013
"Listening to where the person is right now is crucial," says Kristen Maisano, OTD. "From there, I will tell the person that things don't have to be hard forever, we are in this together, and I will help them get where they want to go."
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Michael Roy, MD, Col. (Ret.) talks about how parts of the brain are affected when injured ― from the frontal lobe which houses our emotions to the amygdala which  oversees our fight or flight response.
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Like treating heart disease before a heart attack, says Michael Roy, MD, Col. (Ret.), treating symptoms like anxiety and hypervigilance before they may become part of a full PTSD diagnosis makes the most sense.
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Sometimes PTSD is not fully manifest until treatment for the symptoms of TBI begins.
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Michael Roy, MD, Col. (Ret.) talks about helping service members and veterans learn ways to decrease their anxiety in therapy, which can later translate into strategies to use in life.
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Michael Roy, MD, Col. (Ret.) talks about the efficacy of using Virtual Iraq for treating PTSD, an experiential technology with sights, sounds, and smells that can be highly individualized for the person's experience.
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Virtual reality to treat people with PTSD can be incredibly effective because it helps trigger recalls and stimulate the senses in ways that pure talk therapy cannot.
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Exposure therapy — asking patients with PTSD to close their eyes, imagine themselves back in that traumatic situation, and retell their story — is inherently difficult for people with PTSD, but confronting fears can also be the key to the cure.
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"Medicines seem to help about 50% of people with PTSD," says Michael Roy, MD, Col. (Ret.). "But I see them as a band-aid; they can smooth things over but they don't deal with or help solve the underlying causes."
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy can help people with PTSD look at their behaviors and then use strategies, like relaxation techniques, to overcome the fears and anxieties related to their traumatic experiences.
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Michael Roy, MD, Col. (Ret.) talks about the various means to diagnose PTSD from evaluations and checklists, which rely totally on a person's self-report, to functional MRI imaging and psychophysiological techniques.
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Michael Roy, MD, Col. (Ret.) explains how the Virtual Iraq/Afghanistan technology uses sights, smells, and sounds to help service members and veterans deal and overcome the very intense symptoms of PTSD.
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June 10, 2013
Adam talks about how it wasn't until he fully took control of his own recovery that he started to see big changes in his life. "Take personal accountability for how you want to live your life. The choice is yours."
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Glenn W. Parkinson, MSW, MA | June 10, 2013
Sometimes the length and health of an intimate relationship helps people adapt to changes in their sexual health post-TBI. Sometimes having less sexual experience is a factor. What matters most in recovery is the quality of social support.
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Glenn W. Parkinson, MSW, MA | June 10, 2013
People come with different backgrounds, cultures, and comfort levels when it comes to talking about sex and intimacy. Healthcare providers need open the doors to this conversation slowly and sensitively.
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Glenn W. Parkinson, MSW, MA | June 10, 2013
Sexual health issues can be common after a TBI. Depression, anxiety, the inability to relate to others, hypersexuality, and side effects from medications, among others, can impact how people sees their sexual self.
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Glenn W. Parkinson, MSW, MA | June 10, 2013
After a TBI, it's difficult to feel self-confident — to feel sexy — when you are relying on someone for manyof your daily needs.
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Glenn W. Parkinson, MSW, MA | June 10, 2013
The homecoming for a couple post-deployment can be heady with anticipation, but sometimes going slowly and reestablishing trust and comfort with sex and intimacy can be crucial for finding that closeness again.
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June 3, 2013
If you or a loved one is experiencing symptoms of TBI or PTSD, you're depressed, isolating yourself, or just feeling like something is not right in your head, reach out for help. It is never too early to get the help you need.
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May 20, 2013
Adam talks about why it's important to keep an open line of communication with PTs, OTs, and other healthcare providers during TBI recovery. "You are the only one who knows exactly where you are. Tell them and they can care for you better."
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Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD talks about various treatments for PTSD including imaginal and behavioral exposure treatments as well as addressing issues of guilt and hypervigilance.
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Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD explains word for word what exactly PTSD is, how it can affect someone in the short- and long-term, and what can be done to treat it.
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Lt. Col. Philip Holcombe, PhD talks about the concerns service members and veterans with PTSD have and how health providers can set a foundation for healing.
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Even as babies, children don't miss a beat; they pick up on their parents' emotions. A parent with PTSD can learn that being honest with himself and his family plus knowing his emotional limitations will help the whole family.
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"People who seek psychological help are the kind of people who have the courage to foster the resilience needed to tolerate the traumas that life can sometimes bring."
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A person's reaction and recovery to a traumatic event depends on what life experience he or she had before the event.
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Despite the pre-conceived ideas people may have about hypnotherapy, it is actually more about awareness and control than the lack thereof ... and can help people with TBI and PTSD.
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"Individualized" is the operative word when it comes to creating a treatment plan for someone with
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"Being professional, open, and matter-of-fact with people about death, dying, and suicidality is very important," says Lt. Col Jeffrey Yarvis, PhD.
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Symptoms of TBI and PTSD can overlap, says Lt. Col. Jeffrey Yarvis, PhD, but sometimes treating the psychological ones first makes treating the neurological ones from there more effective.
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"With any kind of trauma — physical or psychological — there comes a sense of betrayal, and with that grief. Regaining a sense of personal control is critical."
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Kristen Maisano, OTD | May 17, 2013
Kristen Maisano, OTD talks about how service dogs can help service members and veterans in many ways — from feeling safe when sleeping to gaining confidence in public places.
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Kristen Maisano, OTD | May 17, 2013
"Rehabilitation for mild TBI and PTSD needs to be service member-directed," says Kristen Maisano, OTD.
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Kristen Maisano, OTD | May 17, 2013
Civilian healthcare providers may need to reach out to specialists in the community to ensure that their patients are getting all of their TBI-related issues addressed.
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Kristen Maisano, OTD | May 17, 2013
Transitioning from the military, where a service member may have had to make many life-and-death decisions, to the civilian world can be challenging.
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Kristen Maisano, OTD | May 17, 2013
OT Kristen Maisano talks about helping patients with TBI attain their goals; sometimes there are ways to retrain the brain, other times the use of compensatory strategies is necessary.
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May 13, 2013
It may be a cliché, but when one door shuts, often another, better one opens. Adam talks about a friend, a retired Marine, who tried something totally out of character and has now not only made a business from it but derives great pleasure from it.
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May 6, 2013
"I've been there ... it's hard!" Adam knows that it's difficult to feel motivated to participate in one's own recovery when the progress seems slow; it's hard to jump in the saddle to get on with your life. He offers support and strategies that work.
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April 29, 2013
People want to help if they see you struggling, but sometimes you want to do whatever you are doing on your own, says Adam. Maybe you have balance problems and taking the stairs is slow going. Make a joke or thank people, but carry on yourself.
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April 22, 2013
Volunteering is a great way to reengage in the world and to be with other veterans with similar issues from TBI, says Adam. Whether going on a fishing or camping trip, volunteering offers a way to bond with others like you and have fun, too.
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April 15, 2013
Adam talks about a friend who runs an art therapy program for vets with TBI and PTSD. "It's a place where you can express yourself in a safe, self-paced environment. A place to be with other vets in a quiet, relaxing setting," explains Adam.
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April 8, 2013
Suicide is invariably tricky to discuss. Adam talks about what signs and symptoms people should be aware of for themselves and for their loved ones who are depressed and also what resources are out there to help.
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April 8, 2013
Adaptive sports like kayaking are great therapy for the injured brain ... and injured spirit. Hear from a few veterans who found hope, friendship, and renewed confidence from being out on the water.
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April 1, 2013
Should you jump in and finish a sentence for someone with TBI who is having trouble speaking or trying to form a word? Should you drop eye contact if the person is struggling? Adam talks about how to respectfully interact with someone with a TBI.
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March 26, 2013
Searching for a job can be frustrating — and exhausting, especially for veterans with TBI. Adam gets some good ideas from Army veteran William Marquez, Virginia Employment Commission.
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March 18, 2013
"Veterans make great employees," Army veteran William Marquez, Virginia Employment Commission, explains to Adam. Prospective employers should focus more on the veterans' hard work, discipline, and skill level and less on any disability they may have.
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March 12, 2013
"I just wanted to turn off the 600 TV sets that were going on all the time in my head." Hear Maj. Jeff Hall's story that went from thoughts of suicide to finding his way back to his family and life.
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March 11, 2013
When searching for a civilian job, veterans should consider finding a friend or buddy in a similar situation with whom to share ideas and strategies. Adam talks with Army veteran William Marquez, Virginia Employment Commission, about this topic.
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March 4, 2013
Adam talks to Army veteran William Marquez, Virginia Employment Commission, about the resources available for veterans to help them find equivalent civilian jobs for what they did on active duty.
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Lee Goldstein, MD, PhD | February 28, 2013
Using animal models in the lab to study the mechanisms of blast-related brain injury, researchers like Dr. Lee Goldstein are feeling optimistic that their findings will lead to viable treatments.
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February 25, 2013
Adam talks with Army veteran William Marquez, Viriginia Employment Commission, about how to help veterans get the necessary licenses, certifications, and training they need to enter the civilian workforce.
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February 19, 2013
Adam talks with Army veteran William Marquez, Viriginia Employment Commission, about how to get the job qualifications needed to transfer from a military to a civilian career.
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Paul Aravich, PhD | February 14, 2013
Dr. Paul Aravich talks about how soldiers, veterans, and civilians can prevent and get treatment for the behavioral complications from TBI that can worsen with age.
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Paul Aravich, PhD | February 14, 2013
For some people with TBI and their caregivers, life can feel painfully isolated. But trying to focus on one's strengths and a healthy and socially engaged lifestyle can help.
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Paul Aravich, PhD | February 14, 2013
Dr. Paul Aravich suggests that veterans with TBI should not look at their loss of capacities but rather their different capacities.
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Paul Aravich, PhD | February 14, 2013
Dr. Paul Aravich talks about PTSD and other serious mental disorders as types of brain injuries, which can come with an increased risk for dementia later in life.
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Jordan Grafman, PhD | February 12, 2013
Dr. Jordan Grafman talks about the many ways caregivers and society as a whole can help people with brain injury more successfully reintegrate into their families and communities.
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Jordan Grafman, PhD | February 12, 2013
Dr. Jordan Grafman talks about the Vietnam vets in a longevity study who were able to create stable, good lives for themselves and their families without much systemized rehab like there is today. 
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Jordan Grafman, PhD | February 12, 2013
In recent wars, there has been more programmatic effort to treat and evaluate soldiers with TBI and PTSD. But are these issues any better resolved than they were 30, 50, 100 years ago?
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Jordan Grafman, PhD | February 12, 2013
Learning to trust the world, to trust caregivers, can be equally if not more effective than drugs for people with executive function or behavioral problems post-TBI.
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Jordan Grafman, PhD | February 11, 2013
Dr. Jordan Grafman talks about how people who had a higher level of skills, interests, and motivation before a brain injury tend to have a better outcome than those who did not.
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February 11, 2013
Adam's injury happened seven years ago, but he still finds he gets frustrated by some of his lingering symptoms. He suggests turning that frustration into a call to action to stay focused on your recovery.
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Jordan Grafman, PhD | February 11, 2013
In a study of Vietnam veterans with TBI, Dr. Jordan Grafman showed that problems navigating social behaviors were the most definitive factors for not being able to return to work.
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Jordan Grafman, PhD | February 11, 2013
Thanks to the input of the caregivers of Vietnam vets enrolled in a longevity study, researchers have been better able to examine the toll of TBI on a person's social behavior.
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Jordan Grafman, PhD | February 11, 2013
Dr. Jordan Grafman discusses the research around aging with a TBI — from the importance of regular social interaction to the strategies for reducing tissue damage as the brain ages.
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Jordan Grafman, PhD | February 11, 2013
Researchers studying Vietnam veterans with TBI are now looking more closely at how TBI can alter a person's social beliefs — from religious and political to legal and moral.
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Jordan Grafman, PhD | February 11, 2013
Researchers are focusing on what damage to the frontal lobes means for a person interviewing for a job, for example, or eating in a restaurant.
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Jordan Grafman, PhD | February 11, 2013
Dr. Jordan Grafman talks about the Vietnam Head Injury Study, started in 1981, that continues to look at the effects of brain injury on current and late-life function.
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February 4, 2013
Like other veterans with TBI, Adam finds talking on a cellphone stressful and uncomfortable. He prefers talking face-to-face with people — that way he can hear better and also see the person's body language.
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January 28, 2013
"Thanks for all the wonderful feedback and support. It's great to know we're helping some folks out there. Now it's your turn. Send in the questions, ideas, or topics you'd like me to address to info@brainline.org."
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January 25, 2013
Former Marine Mike Zacchea does not remember his wedding. Or a trip to Florida. For a long time, he didn't realize he had sustained several debilitating blast-related concussions as well as PTSD.
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January 25, 2013
"PTSD turns my husband into a monster. But my husband is a hero. He is not a monster."
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January 25, 2013
Matt Brown, who suffers from combat-related TBI and PTSD, talks about how his family helped him defeat his suicidal tendencies and his depression — and become human again.
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January 25, 2013
Former Marine Matt Brown, who suffers from combat-related TBI and PTSD — talks about strategies and games that have helped him with his memory and daily routine.
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January 25, 2013
Mike Zacchea finally got psychological help after setting his house on fire because he thought his wife was an insurgent.
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January 25, 2013
Although she hates to have to talk to her husband — who suffers from combat-related TBI and PTSD — like a child, sometimes that's the only way she can get him to understand her.
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January 25, 2013
Former Marine Matt Brown, who has TBI and PTSD, was dangerously suicidal and he would never "sugarcoat" that fact. It was finding his voice to help others that saved him.
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January 22, 2013
A friend of Adam's told him about the Pomodoro Technique — a time management method that breaks up periods of work into 25-minute intervals. In a nutshell, frequent breaks can improve focus and mental agility.
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Dr. Geoffrey Ling talks about the military's success in creating a standard, system of care for TBI — from immediate assessment to admittance into a concussion restoration center.
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Although other treatments for second impact syndrome are being studied, the two hallmark treatments now are rest and removal from play. They should not be underestimated.
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Dr. Geoffrey Ling talks about misconceptions about TBI — from thinking a concussion is different from a mild TBI to believing that a TBI will always come with life-long, debilitating consequences.
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Dr. Geoffrey Ling describes PREVENT, an initiative to better understand the spectrum of injury — from the more inflammation-driven injury of mild TBI to the tissue destruction of severe TBI.
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As a researcher and clinician, Dr. Geoffrey Ling knows that research needs to be fast and efficient because patients are waiting now!
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Dr. Geoffrey Ling talks about the importance of an interdisciplinary team to treat TBI and PTSD because oftentimes, if one is left untreated, treatment for the other often stays stalled.
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Dr. Geoffrey Ling talks about the use of the Military Acute Concussion Exam — a simple, standardized tool for first providers.
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With the burgeoning understanding of the cellular and biochemical effects of brain injury, pharmacologists can successfully intercede with more promising standardized treatment.
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Dr. Geoffrey Ling talks about what it would take to duplicate the military's top-notch standard of care for TBI in the civilian sector.
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Dr. Geoffrey Ling shares his work on the Revolutionizing Prosthetics Program, especially on the mechanical arm that allows a soldier to open a door, feed himself, even pick up an M&M.
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Dr. Geoffrey Ling talks about DARPA's tiny blast gauge, which worn now by 11,000 soldiers, can quantify who is at risk for brain injury so that they can get screened and treated more quickly.
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January 14, 2013
Adam knows that sometimes for veterans life after combat feels like its being lived on autopilot — with little joy. Adam shares some ideas and strategies to turn that situation around.
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January 7, 2013
Pain can negatively color one's life, especially when that person has a brain injury where energy is at a premium as it is. Adam shares his advice.
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December 31, 2012
Just like a squad, flight, or platoon, a family needs to come together after a brain injury as a support unit. Adam talks about how the change in family roles can be hard, but patience and communication will help the family work together as a whole.
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December 17, 2012
For some service members and veterans after a brain injury, speaking becomes harder whether it is with word retrieval or the amount of time it takes to formulate and deliver a response or comment. Adam shares his experience with being a sensitive and respectful listener.
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December 11, 2012
Sometimes service members and veterans with TBI and/or PTSD find it easier to be alone, away from people — even family and friends. But ultimately, that is not healthy. Adam shares ideas to help loved ones ease back into life events without adding stress.
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November 26, 2012
It's understandable that service members and veterans can get angry or frustrated when witnessing people in the civilian world getting upset about something trivial like a coffee made wrong. Adam shares some ideas.
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November 19, 2012
Accepting changes in oneself after a brain injury can be difficult. But denying the changes, over the long run, will be more painful — for the injured person and those he loves. Adam shares his experience.
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November 12, 2012
Guilt never feels good. But it's important for service members and veterans with TBI to talk openly about these feelings with their family, friends, and therapists and realize that they are all working toward that person's best outcome. Adam shares his thoughts on the subject.
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October 30, 2012
When preparing children to see a loved one with a severe or moderate brain injury — one that may include significant changes physically and emotionally — it's best to be honest and upfront. Adam shares some good idease about how to help kids face the new reality of their loved one.
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Richard Ellenbogen, MD | October 23, 2012
But research shows that taking the time to rest after a concussion gets people back to combat and on the field faster and more safely.
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October 22, 2012
Do you feel your anger start to hyper-escalate when someone steals your parking spot or cuts you in line at the grocery store? That is not uncommon for service members trying to transition back into civilian life. Adam suggests talking to someone who's been there, who understands.
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October 15, 2012
For some service members and veterans like Adam, returning from a depolyment can feel like riding an emotional rollercoaster. He recommends trying to recognize these emotions, to become more self-aware as a way to break the vicious cycle of intense emotions and frustration.
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October 9, 2012
One of the pitfalls of TBI can be a lack of motivation, but setting a small daily goal like cleaning the refridgerator or walking the dog can lead to bigger goals like lunch out or playing frisbee in the park with friends. Adam shares some ideas.
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October 1, 2012
Adam shares an email from a Marine's wife about "brain fatigue." She worries that people — including her injured husband — think he is lazy or less proactive when it's simply a physiological symptom of the TBI. Adam offers kind and sage advice.
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Shane McNamee, MD | September 28, 2012
Dr. McNamee's passion is to get people with TBI and combat stress back to work, back to the next phases of their lives.
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Shane McNamee, MD | September 28, 2012
The VA is dedicated to not only providing the care that veterans need today, but also what they will need in the future.
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Shane McNamee, MD | September 28, 2012
Dr. Shane McNamee talks about helping each veteran transform from a patient with complex injuries back to an individual with many roles — Marine, father, husband, son, athlete, artist ...
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Shane McNamee, MD | September 28, 2012
Healthcare providers can help vets with TBI and combat stress find other ways than pharmaceuticals to help in recovery — from riding horses to kayaking with other vets.
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Shane McNamee, MD | September 28, 2012
The VA works creatively to help patients with TBI and combat stress — and their families — recover and rebuild a full life.
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Gerard Riedy, MD, PhD | September 28, 2012
The MRI machine at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence generates far more information and images than do standard MRI machines.
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Gerard Riedy, MD, PhD | September 28, 2012
Neuroradiologist Gerard Riedy talks about the variety of ways the PET scan can be used to image injuries to the brain.
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Gerard Riedy, MD, PhD | September 28, 2012
Ironically, people with TBI and their families are relieved when neuroimaging shows a problem. Those images can give answers that can lead to more individually tailored treatment.
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Gerard Riedy, MD, PhD | September 28, 2012
Many experts collaborated on the plan for the National Intrepid Center of Excellence with the goal of creating an objective measure to better characterize brain injury, and then treat it.
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Gerard Riedy, MD, PhD | September 28, 2012
Neuroimaging the brain with a MEG can show, in real time, how damage to the brain can interrupt, slow, or stop communication from one part of the brain to other parts.
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Gerard Riedy, MD, PhD | September 28, 2012
The NICoE has $10 million worth of neuroimaging equipment for evaluating TBI and psychological health issues, most importantly, the MRI, the PET scan, and the MEG.
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Gerard Riedy, MD, PhD | September 28, 2012
Neuroimaging the brains of service members with blast-related TBI are showing patterns of variable damage, perhaps most notably in the cerebellum.
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Shane McNamee, MD | September 27, 2012
The VA — along with the DoD — works with veterans and some active duty service members and their families to help them rebuild their lives after TBI and other polytrauma injuries.
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Shane McNamee, MD | September 27, 2012
The VA is dedicated on a national level to making sure veterans in rural areas continue to get care even after they have left the main centers.
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Shane McNamee, MD | September 27, 2012
Traumatic — and joyful — experiences change who we are. We cannot "fix" soldiers coming home with combat stress, rather help them move on and become new versions of themselves.
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Shane McNamee, MD | September 27, 2012
Combat exposure can damage the brain physically and psychologically. Working to find the causes of these injuries will help with the nuances of treatment.
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Shane McNamee, MD | September 27, 2012
How could going to Walmart ever feel "normal" after combat-induced stress? Dr. Shane McNamee of the VA talks about the physical and psychological effects of blast injuries.
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Robin Weinick, PhD | September 24, 2012
The RAND Corporation is continuing its research, looking at what programs for TBI and psychological health in soldiers and veterans are working best and how to share that knowledge.
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Robin Weinick, PhD | September 24, 2012
The main recommendations from RAND report on TBI and psych health included centralizing information, addressing gaps, and studying ways in which programs can find people with early symptoms.
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Robin Weinick, PhD | September 24, 2012
Researchers talked to more than 600 people in the military who might know anything about TBI and psychological health to learn more about available programs.
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Robin Weinick, PhD | September 24, 2012
Service members, veterans, their families, and professionals can find programs to help with brain injury and psychological health at Military OneSource and the Rand Corporation.
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September 18, 2012
Having a brain injury can sometimes make people feel differently about themselves, perhaps less confident, which can make meeting people challenging. Adam recommends slowly pushing yourself to engage in social activities ... and gaining back some confidence.
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September 10, 2012
Adam knows from his experiences as well as those of most of his friends with TBI that social situations can be difficult. Sometimes they know they can come off as "rude or self-absorbed" but that way of being, or seeming, is more a function of cognitive dysfunction.
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September 4, 2012
It's common for service members and veterans, like Adam, with a brain injury and/or post-traumatic stress to return home from combat and have intense feelings they don't know what to do with. But with help and patience, these emotions will settle down.
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Tina Trudel, PhD | August 29, 2012
Soldiers with TBI and their families should not stop looking for help and guidance; recovery will not happen if people isolate themselves.
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Tina Trudel, PhD | August 29, 2012
Althought incredibly important, issues of intimacy, sexuality, and even parenting after a brain injury are often overlooked in both research and practice.
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Tina Trudel, PhD | August 29, 2012
Blast injuries are a complex form of injury — from the effects of pressure waves on the body's tissue to the psychological trauma that can come with physical injury.
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August 20, 2012
For people with combat-related TBI, being in unfamiliar places can be very stressful. Adam suggests starting slowly with a picnic or a walk and building up to longer getaways.
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August 13, 2012
Adam shares his experiences of having to push through the frustrating periods during his recovery from brain injury and continue to make progress.
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August 7, 2012
Overwhelming fatigue post-injury can be due to disrupted sleep patterns — and there are strategies to help.
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July 30, 2012
For veterans and service members with TBI, getting help anonymously is available. But Adam encourages taking the courageous step to reach out for help.
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July 23, 2012
Adam didn't realize the ramifications of his TBI until he returned home, away from the combat environment.
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Janna Harris, PhD | July 20, 2012
Biomarkers are anything that can measure acutely and then identify the prognosis or future development of a person's brain injury.
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Technology, like the use of smartphones as a memory tool, has helped advance strategies for people with TBI.
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Col. Beverly Scott, MD | July 20, 2012
Service members need to share their injury history, symptoms, and any diagnosis or treatment done in theater to help their stateside doctors better tailor care.
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Col. Beverly Scott, MD | July 20, 2012
Concussion Recovery Centers, located near service members' units, are quiet, comfortable environments conducive for rest and recovery after a brain injury.
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Inbal Eshel, MA, CCC-SLP | July 19, 2012
It used to be believed that the brain could not change or significantly heal after injury. Nothing could be farther from the truth.
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July 17, 2012
Social events can be quite draining for people with a brain injury. Adam says learning to give yourself the downtime you need — before and after the event — is helpful.
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July 9, 2012
Stops, lines, colors, directions — and lots of people rushing to and from trains. Riding the subway can be anxiety making and confusing, especially after a combat-related brain injury. Adam shares some strategies.
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Service members and veterans can use Walter Reed's Brain Fitness Center's games and tools to help overall cognitive function.
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Derek McGinnis | July 3, 2012
Realizing you are not the only one with a brain injury gives you the ability to get insight into the injury-related challenges, get help, make a plan, and carry on from there. Navy veteran Derek McGinnis shares his experience.
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Derek McGinnis | July 3, 2012
"Being in the hospital after a TBI — tubes and machines attached everywhere — is scary and frustrating. Only the Marines were able to calm me down." Navy veteran Derek McGinnis shares his experience.
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Derek McGinnis | July 3, 2012
Focus on what you can do after injury, give it 110% effort, and the other abilities will come. Navy veteran Derek McGinnis shares his experience.
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Derek McGinnis | July 3, 2012
Vets and service members need help after injury not only to build on the strengths they once had but also to realize how to grow and change from there. Navy veteran Derek McGinnis shares his experience.
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Derek McGinnis | July 3, 2012
Team Semper Fi has given Navy veteran Derek McGinnis and many other veterans with TBI and/or lost limbs a place to face challenges and meet them with pride and a sense of belonging.
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Derek McGinnis | July 3, 2012
Facebook and other social media sites are effective ways for military vets like Navy veteran Derek McGinnis to connect with other vets who are experiencing the same challenges post-injury, post-deployment.
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Derek McGinnis | July 3, 2012
The wife of Navy veteran Derek McGinnis, in a supportive and loving way, helped him become independent after his brain and other injuries. She acted like his wife, not his caregiver.
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Derek McGinnis | July 3, 2012
Derek McGinnis, an Iraq veteran, tells the story of his deployment, his combat injuries (brain, leg, hand, and more), and the road back to recovery.
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Derek McGinnis | July 3, 2012
"There have been people who didn't leave me even when I told them to, who gave me chances, who listened even during my darkest times post-injury. I couldn't have made it without them." Navy veteran Derek McGinnis shares his experience.
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July 2, 2012
An important event at work can take careful planning and energy — before and after the event. Adam shares some tips to help you "break a leg."
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SLPs use effective strategies for their patients with TBI based on the model of "goal, plan, predict, do, and review."
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June 25, 2012
Starting with an internship and assessing your skills and abilities post-TBI are two strategies to help you successfully return to the work force. Adam shares his experience.
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Inbal Eshel, MA, CCC-SLP | June 16, 2012
Helping a patient with cognitive and language difficulties after a TBI does not have to involve bells and whistles.
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Inbal Eshel, MA, CCC-SLP | June 12, 2012
SLPs perform standardized cognitive and language tests as well as an in-depth interview with people with TBI to hear what difficulties they are facing in their day-to-day life.
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The number of service members and veterans using the Brain Fitness Center has jumped exponentially.
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Speech-language pathologists focus exclusively on a patient's cognitive and language complaints after a TBI. The other members of the interdisciplinary team focus on their specialities like headache care, sleep problems, and behavioral issues.
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The Brain Fitness Center at Walter Reed National Mlitary Medical Center is a "brain gym" for service members and veterans.
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Using metacognitive strategies sounds fancy, but it's a simple concept. SLPs give patients one strategy to apply across many situations.
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May 29, 2012
No one wants to feel like a slacker or be perceived as one. Adam shares some excellent advice about how to get necessary accommodations with the help of the school's administration and professors.
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May 21, 2012
Being back from deployment, especially with a TBI, can be overwhleming and paying bills sometimes gets lost in the shuffle of treatment, recovery, school, work, and family. Adam recommends using automatic bill paying.
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We know that blast waves alone can damage the human brain. But more research is needed to learn how exactly blast waves alone damage the brain's cells, blood vessels, and structure as a whole.
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The changes in weaponry during the recent conflicts compared with weaponry in previous wars have made TBI, especially mTBI, a common and complex injury among returning service members.
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May 16, 2012
Along Recovery is an intimate portrait of TBI, the signature wound of Afghanistan and Iraq. This film documents the TBI recovery process from the perspective of four soldiers recently evacuated from combat operations.
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May 14, 2012
Adam Anicich talks about why going to a restaurant post-TBI is often far from relaxing and what to do to make the experience better.
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Care for patients with TBI has always been tailored for the individual, but the strategies speech therapist use and how  patients are taught to apply them have developed with time, research, and clinical practice.
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May 7, 2012
Adam learned to implement his "four-finger approach" — something he learned in OT at the VA — so he never forgets his wallet, keys, cellphone, and sunglasses.
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Research on the use of blood biomarkers for diagnosing brain injuries — in theater and in the civilian world — is getting closer. The hope is to be able to use it as a standard diagnostic tool.
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Janna Harris, PhD | May 2, 2012
Neurometabolite is a chemical within cells in the brain that reflects function or dysfunction within those cells.
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April 5, 2012
A simple, yet powerful message — Wear Your Helmet. Watch DVBIC's prevention video which was shown on a Super Screen in New York City's Times Square in the spring of 2012.
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March 27, 2012
New appliances, like Adam's microwave, come with all sorts of buttons, displays, and settings. Heating up rice for the first time is not always easy.
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Frank C. Tortella, ST, PhD | March 24, 2012
An IED explosion can not only cause a blast injury from the shock waves themselves, but can also cause concussion or a penetrating injury at the same time.
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March 20, 2012
After his brain injury, Adam had to create strategies to help him associate names with faces — from gleaning identifying factors in conversation to adding photos to his electronic contacts.
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March 13, 2012
One-on-one conversations are easy and fun, but for someone like Adam, who has a brain injury, being in a large group can be challenging.
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Col. Dallas Hack, MD | March 8, 2012
Despite grievous wounds, including brain injury, survival rates are at an all-time high because of improved body protection and medical care from theater to hospital.
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Col. Dallas Hack, MD | March 8, 2012
COL Hack talks about the Army's thousands of Combat Casualty Care projects, including 450-500 just for brain injury research and care.
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Frank C. Tortella, ST, PhD | March 7, 2012
Diagnosing a mild TBI often has to rely on subjective evaluations. A standard, objective screening tool like a blood biomarker would help with diagnosis and with tracking recovery.
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March 6, 2012
After his brain injury, Adam Anicich needed help getting organized, remembering appointments and people, and finding places. His Smartphone -- with its proactive calendar and GPS function -- has as helped him remedy his "sloppiness."
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Joel Scholten, MD | February 15, 2012
Every service member transitioning from the DoD to the VA is screened for TBI. If detected, a comprehensive evaluation is performed.
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Joel Scholten, MD | February 15, 2012
When looking at the full-picture treatment for people with TBI, clinicians need to ask leading questions about issues including alcohol and caffeine use, intimacy or sexual issues, and suicide risk.
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Joel Scholten, MD | February 15, 2012
Increased awareness of the short- and long-term issues of TBI has helped improve programs for comprehensive TBI screenings and evaluations. But many treatments are still in the research phase.
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Frank C. Tortella, ST, PhD | February 2, 2012
Special Forces are being studied during breacher training in which they experience real explosive events in hopes of answering more questions about the effects of blasts on the brain.
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December 30, 2011
Questions about childhood, habits pre- and post-TBI, and how relationships can change are all part of taking a full case history.
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December 16, 2011
Taking a detailed case history is crucial for tailoring a recovery plan for service members or vets with TBI.
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Joel Scholten, MD | December 14, 2011
Helping improve function and mood for patients post-TBI involves getting the whole picture of a person, his symptoms, and how they are affecting his life.
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Joel Scholten, MD | December 14, 2011
Providers know a treatment plan works best when the patient and family are involved with the medical team; the group can set realistic and meaningful rehab goals for quality of life.
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Col. Dallas Hack, MD | December 14, 2011
Blood biomarkers could enormously change the way TBI — from severe to mild — is diagnosed and then treated.
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Jeffrey Bazarian, MD | December 1, 2011
Surgical and non-surgical interventions for TBI, especially those that are more severe, hinge on accurate diagnosis. More research is needed to fine-tune how TBIs are diagnosed, in ERs and in theater.
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Col. Dallas Hack, MD | December 1, 2011
Army COL Dallas Hack, MD, talks about the challenges in diagnosing and treating TBI — from the dearth of research to the lack of definitive treatments.
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November 29, 2011
The military is offering stronger services for service members and vets who have TBI and substance abuse issues, such as the availability of regional care coordinators for Guard and Reserve.
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November 29, 2011
For service members with mild TBI and substance abuse issues, their job is to get better. Their command works with them to get them better and back to their units.
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Shane McNamee, MD | November 23, 2011
Above all else, the TBI doctors and therapists at the the US Department of Veterans Affairs listen. They learn what makes each injured person — and his family — tick, so they can help put them back together and return them to a full life.
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November 22, 2011
After a severe TBI, Airman First Class David Rogers continues to work with the VA rehab staff. They set no limits for him — he even goes rock climbing.
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November 8, 2011
This documentary follows the journey of childhood friends who join the National Guard and end up combat veterans dealing with TBI and PTSD.
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David A. Hovda, PhD | October 28, 2011
Progress in research and treatment for brain injury may seem slow, but a closer look will show otherwise.
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David A. Hovda, PhD | October 28, 2011
There is always more to learn, but certain changes — from monitoring cranial pressure to having patients lie at an incline instead of flat — have increased recovery in patients post-injury.
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David A. Hovda, PhD | October 28, 2011
Today versus 20 years ago, the standards of care for TBI across the US have vastly improved. However, these standards could certainly be higher and more consistent across all medical centers.
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David A. Hovda, PhD | October 28, 2011
Researcher David Hovda, PhD is less interested in aptosis — or cell death — after TBI than what the cells that survive are doing to compensate for what is lost.
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David A. Hovda, PhD | October 28, 2011
Is a subconcussive event a concussive event that only affects one part of the brain? Learn more about what research is showing, and hopes to show in the future.
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David A. Hovda, PhD | October 28, 2011
"I try to teach my TBI research students to get rid of scientific tenets, to let the door open to other possibilities."
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David A. Hovda, PhD | October 28, 2011
Research in TBI can seem slow. But even small steps can make an incredible difference in the quality of life of people with TBI.
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David A. Hovda, PhD | October 28, 2011
The human brain is a wonderful organ with amazing flexibility. Learn more about recovery.
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David A. Hovda, PhD | October 28, 2011
The research into the hows and whys of blast injuries continues — from the impact of pressure waves to the push and pull of air blasts.
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David A. Hovda, PhD | October 28, 2011
"War is now an intermingled mess of insurgencies ... making injuries different from previous wars."
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David A. Hovda, PhD | October 28, 2011
Learn how new procedures and new treatment facilities are greatly benefiting service members with brain injury.
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Deborah Shear, PhD | October 28, 2011
There is a paucity of research on stem cell therapy and TBI compared with Parkinson's, stroke, and Alzheimer's. Continued research might reveal more.
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Deborah Shear, PhD | October 28, 2011
Researchers still need to discover the underlying "why" when looking at stem cell therapy for people with severe traumatic brain injury.
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Deborah Shear, PhD | October 28, 2011
Brain Injury researchers are making steady steps — from studying the use of progesterone for treatment to biomarkers for diagnosis.
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Deborah Shear, PhD | October 28, 2011
Stem cell research and brain injury started to take off in the late 1990s. Learn about progress being made in the field.
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Deborah Shear, PhD | October 28, 2011
Stem cell transplantion is irreversible, so more research is needed to reveal how stem cells actually promote functional recovery in the brain.
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October 28, 2011
Watch this Marine's powerful story of recovery — with the help of his therapists at the VA and his own family.
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October 28, 2011
Millions of Americans have served in the all-volunteer military since 9/11, with many repeatedly returning to the battlefield. Gwen Ifill reports on how this past decade of war has led to increased stress on America's troops and their families, and how today's uniformed warriors are coping with previously unimagined challenges.
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July 20, 2011
Este anuncio de servicio público nos introduce a Shannon Maxwell, la esposa de Lt. Col. Timothy Maxwell, USMC (ret), que sufrió una lesión cerebral traumática durante su servicio combate en Irak. La señora Maxwell presenta un nuevo recurso de DVBIC: La guía para cuidadores familiares.
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July 19, 2011
This public service announcement features Shannon Maxwell, the wife of Lt. Col. Timothy Maxwell, USMC (ret), who sustained a TBI while fighting in Iraq. Mrs. Maxwell introduces us to a new resource from DVBIC: the Family Caregiver Guide.
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May 27, 2011
"For Ted, the first year of his recovery was like being born all over again, except accelerated."
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May 5, 2011
Learn about this powerful community-based intervention program designed to help homeless veterans "combat" life on the streets.
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April 12, 2011
Many factors can affect a person's reintegration after TBI -- from family support to community awareness.
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April 12, 2011
Learn why professionals need to treat TBIs in service members and veterans differently from those in civilians ... and how the VA can help.
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April 1, 2011
"We are just one family among thousands who have suffered injuries in this war ..."
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March 8, 2011
For service members, vets, families, and providers, this DVBIC PSA features Captain James Hancock, MD who shares his perspective as a shock trauma platoon doctor and a person with a TBI.
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March 8, 2011
Dirigida los miembros del servicio militar, los veteranos, las familias y los proveedores, este anuncio de servicio público de DVBIC presenta al Commander Hancock, MD, quien comparte su punto de vista en su calidad de médico de pelotón de choque traumático y persona que sufrió una lesión cerebral.
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January 31, 2011
A real hero knows when to ask for help. Sgt. Josh Hopper, who sustained a TBI in Iraq, is one such hero.
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January 31, 2011
When a service member deploys, everyone around them is affected. Learn more from these brave warriors and their loved ones.
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David Cifu, MD | November 12, 2010
Post-deployment syndrome can include concussion, PTSD, major depression, chronic pain, and general anxiety disorder.
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David Cifu, MD | November 12, 2010
Successful recovery from post-deployment syndrome starts with good sleep hygiene.
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David Cifu, MD | November 12, 2010
Not knowing the root of medical and psychological problems often exacerbates the issues; a clear diagnosis is important for successful recovery.
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David Cifu, MD | November 12, 2010
With the help of your doctor and your family, laying out a strategy with priorities for recovery makes all the difference in recovery.
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David Cifu, MD | November 12, 2010
Start by creating good sleep patterns and addressing headaches; then it's time to tackle the other symptoms.
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David Cifu, MD | November 12, 2010
Clinicians need to define a methodical framework of recovery for people with post-deployment syndrome.
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Harvey Jacobs, PhD | November 12, 2010
Symptoms of TBI and PTSD overlap; treating the whole person is crucial.
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Pax
November 9, 2010
A service dog like Pax doesn't just impact one person's life, rather a whole network of people.
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James Kelly, MD | October 20, 2010
Military experts are working to define what baseline testing for TBI would be most effective for pre- and post-deployment comparison, as well as for use in theater.
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James Kelly, MD | October 20, 2010
To date, there is no distinctive rating system for blast-induced concussions.
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October 20, 2010
The definition is the same as in the civilian world, but different precautions are taken before a soldier is released back to combat.
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James Kelly, MD | October 20, 2010
From the top medical and non-medical command down, brain injuries must be taken seriously in the military.
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James Kelly, MD | October 20, 2010
Screening all service members who've had a risk of a concussion is a big step forward.
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James Kelly, MD | October 20, 2010
Soldiers who have sustained three concussions will receive a more detailed, mandatory evaluation before returning to combat.
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Michael McCrea, PhD | October 20, 2010
Symptoms of PTSD and post-concussive syndrome can overlap significantly. Should they be treated the same way?
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Michael McCrea, PhD | October 20, 2010
For most people after a single concussion, a 7-10 day course of rest and recovery clears up most problems. Recurring TBIs are a different story.
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September 21, 2010
The powerful story of Pax, an amazing dog trained by an inmate to help an Iraq vet transform his life.
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Jeffrey Barth, PhD | July 29, 2010
What are the similarities and differences between sports injuries and blast injuries?
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Deborah Little, PhD | May 25, 2010
Learn why after being in combat zone, drinking and driving may not seem like risky behavior.
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March 16, 2010
Learn more about how the military addresses mild TBI and PTSD in their soldiers.
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John D. Corrigan, PhD | March 16, 2010
"For veterans and non-veterans with TBI, the only amount of drugs and alcohol that is safe is none." 
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A brain injury can significantly affect a person's ability to make good choices in relationships. 
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March 16, 2010
One in five combat soldiers suffers a TBI, who should care for them? Watch clip from PBS show Now.
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March 13, 2010
Watch this powerful story about two brave and loving wives who care for their husbands after they both sustained severe brain injuries in combat.
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January 4, 2010
Meet several brave service members and their family members who are struggling with the effects of traumatic brain injury sustained in combat.
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Having full awareness of her long-term issues from TBI has helped Dr. Kelli Gary adapt strategies that work and make choices that better order her life.
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December 2, 2009
Kelli Gary talks about the struggles she faced when going back to complete her education and some of the ways she coped with the difficulties caused by her injury.
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Kelli Gary talks about deciding to go back to school after her traumatic brain injury and her mom who supported her even when school didn't work out the first time.
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"I never gave up. I knew it was harder. Things were more difficult. It would take more time. But I never gave up."
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Kelli Gary talks about new personal limitations she faced after her traumatic brain injury and how she finally came to deal with and realize that life would be different.
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Kelli Gary talks about the strategies she used to rebuild her social supports after her traumatic brain injury.
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Kelli Gary talks about the compensatory strategies that she found through her own experience worked for her — like recording herself reading her text books to better prepare for class and tests.
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Kelli Gary talks about her life living with traumatic brain injury and dealing with the everyday struggles she never anticipated.
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May 21, 2009
Four soldiers navigate the difficult path of recovery from TBI.
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May 7, 2009
“Stay focused and patient and you'll get better.”
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April 29, 2009
Even after losing a leg and sustaining a mild TBI, this veteran is moving with a new confidence.
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Jeffrey Bazarian, MD | April 1, 2009
Find out about research on TBI in the military setting.
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March 25, 2009
Preview of Sesame Street's episode "Coming Home: Military Families Cope with Change." Featuring guest stars Queen Latifah, John Mayer, Elmo, and Rosita.
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Maria Mouratidis, PsyD | March 4, 2009
BrainLine talks with Dr. Maria Mouratidis about how to address thoughts of suicide in someone dealing with a TBI, PTSD, or depression.
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Maria Mouratidis, PsyD | March 4, 2009
BrainLine talks with Dr. Maria Mouratidis about her experiences working with military families.
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Maria Mouratidis, PsyD | March 4, 2009
BrainLine talks with Dr. Maria Mouratidis about the heroes she works with on a daily basis.
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February 3, 2009
The story of one marriage after TBI.
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January 26, 2009
This video, created by the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, focuses on the ebb and flow of recovery from TBI and features Former Secretary of State Colin Powell as well as several medical professionals and individuals with TBI.
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January 26, 2009
NewHour host Jim Lehrer tackles the question: What happens to service members after they survive a traumatic brain injury?
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Michael Paul Mason | December 1, 2008
BrainLine got the chance to catch up with Michael Paul Mason about his trip to Iraq to visit the primary trauma care at the Air Force hospital in Balad.
 


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